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Posted by: Haji
« on: March 30, 2017, 12:43:02 PM »

So, ehm, how close it actually is?

The planet orbits 4.2m kilometres from the centre of the system. The diameter of the star is apparently 8.1m km. I don't know how Aurora handles roundings but if we take the numbers at face value, the planet is hovering one hundred and fifty thousand kilometres above the surface of the star. Less than half the distance between Earth and Moon. The orbital period is also fun - 47 hours. Ah, that's only 152 kilometres per second, not as fast as I thought.

Strangely enough the temperatures is only 1425C despite it being a Venusian world. At the same time it's just a small, dim dwarf with luminosity 5% of Suns. And as it is quite young it may explain why the rock has an atmosphere at all.
Posted by: Detros
« on: March 29, 2017, 06:45:28 PM »

You can't sneeze at a 6 hour saving. Just think of the nap you could have?
No. Naps. Must. Play. Aurora. All. Night. @_@
Posted by: MarcAFK
« on: March 29, 2017, 06:42:39 PM »

You can't sneeze at a 6 hour saving. Just think of the nap you could have?
Posted by: Detros
« on: March 29, 2017, 06:31:22 PM »

Just wait till it's closer in it's orbit, might shave a year off the travel time.
No way, I am just 2b km from A sun. If I wait like 2m years the B sun will be just like 6 hours closer to the JP :D
Posted by: MarcAFK
« on: March 29, 2017, 06:09:42 PM »

Just wait till it's closer in it's orbit, might shave a year off the travel time.
Posted by: Detros
« on: March 29, 2017, 05:54:36 PM »

I don't think I've seen a planet quite this close yet.
So, ehm, how close it actually is?

On the other hand, here is the opposite extreme: Gliese 414.

Off-Topic: show

Binary system where around A sun is nothing, just survey locations. Around B there are both planets with moons and asteroids. And where B sun is orbiting A sun at 0.3 ly. And no Lagrange intersystem jump points available, great.

It would take my gravsurvey ships with their speed of 3k km/s over 30 years to get there.
Even my big tanker design, one 50 HS engine strapped to 2M fuel tank, can fly only third of this distance. And only one way.
Posted by: Haji
« on: March 26, 2017, 07:23:39 PM »

I don't think I've seen a planet quite this close yet.

Posted by: Lossmar
« on: September 17, 2016, 08:10:22 AM »

I dont have pics but i had two very strange systems :

One with TWO colony cost 0 planets ( close to, it was something akin to 0.25 colony cost ) , one moon and one comet and nothing else.
And second with only ONE 0 colony cost planet AND NOTHING ELSE, not even the lousiest of moons or asteroids :D

It felt like playing some Master of Orion game :)
Posted by: Drgong
« on: August 26, 2016, 01:36:13 PM »

Show what cool star systems you have found?

Here two I have in my current game

1 - first time I came across one of the big binary systems.
2 - The Gas giants never cleared out those asteroids!
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