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C# Bureau of Design / Re: Emergency Build Program
« Last post by bdub1 on Yesterday at 11:25:12 PM »
You have no defense against enemy missiles.
First priority should be building a class with some sort of anti-missile defense to support these ships, 10cm railguns can make a good start with minimal investment for research

Hmm
Yeah, ill expedite my plans for a railgun cruiser, then.
I've got gauss reload 4, so perhaps a mixed armament would be good for both PD and anti-ship.
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C# Mechanics / Re: Water and Terrain in Eccentric Orbits
« Last post by Bremen on Yesterday at 07:30:25 PM »
What about just adding a new environment/hydrosphere for sufficiently eccentric planets? IE on that planet instead of swapping back and forth between them it would just say Environment: Extreme Variations and Hydrosphere: Seasonal?

My concern with giving inertia to the hydrosphere is that it might complicate terraforming. Hydrosphere changes albedo, which normally isn't an issue since it shifts instantly, so if you're adding greenhouse gases to a planet at some point you'll get a message the hydrosphere has melted and that bumps the temperature up further. But if there's a delay, that could mean terraforming too quickly would result in you getting the planet up to a pleasant temperature, then the hydrosphere melts and the temperature jumps past the high end of tolerance.
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C# Mechanics / Re: Water and Terrain in Eccentric Orbits
« Last post by KriegsMeister on Yesterday at 06:34:55 PM »
I don't know the exact math, but shouldn't atmospheric pressure have an insulatory effect regulating the extreme temperature radiation.  I know on a daily scale this is important in comparing min/max day/night temperatures between earth, Mars and mercury, and I would assume the effect would be present though likely not as strong for longer time scales for orbital eccentricity.

Could maybe even add another -isium type gas that reduces temperature variation.
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C# Mechanics / Re: Water and Terrain in Eccentric Orbits
« Last post by Density on Yesterday at 04:13:58 PM »
Does this mean adding ice will lower albedo in 1.14/2.0?

Water to turning to ice and vice versa already changes albedo in v1.13.

I was refering to

Yes, although I probably should change it so that adding ice reduces Albedo.

which I haven't seen mentioned in any of the Changes Lists.
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C# Mechanics / Re: Water and Terrain in Eccentric Orbits
« Last post by Steve Walmsley on Yesterday at 12:36:40 PM »
Liquid to ice and back is less of an issue because it only affects albedo and doesn't introduce a sudden 2.0 colony cost (and I already include albedo changes in the min/max temperature and min/max colony costs). I could perhaps track the percentage of water that is frozen, rather than having separate states, but in reality the water to ice process happens quite quickly so probably not worth it.

Does this mean adding ice will lower albedo in 1.14/2.0?

Water to turning to ice and vice versa already changes albedo in v1.13.
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C# Mechanics / Re: Water and Terrain in Eccentric Orbits
« Last post by Density on Yesterday at 12:12:10 PM »
Liquid to ice and back is less of an issue because it only affects albedo and doesn't introduce a sudden 2.0 colony cost (and I already include albedo changes in the min/max temperature and min/max colony costs). I could perhaps track the percentage of water that is frozen, rather than having separate states, but in reality the water to ice process happens quite quickly so probably not worth it.

Does this mean adding ice will lower albedo in 1.14/2.0?
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C# Mechanics / Re: Water and Terrain in Eccentric Orbits
« Last post by Zap0 on Yesterday at 10:08:27 AM »
As for vegetation... There is no option to have any sort of soil on anoxic planet. No life - no sod - no soil. There will be plenty of rocks, sand and mineral dust, yet to have a soil or even clay (except on oceanic abyssal flat) - you need at least thousands of years of ubiquitous terrestrial vegetation.

So I think it will be cool to have this feature: a boolean field Soil Layer, possible for the same planets that have oxygen, mandatory for homeworld planets, can be erazed with backing (I'd say average surface temp 1000C), cannot be restored during playtime, mandatory for <1.50 CC.

Two things: If you can't create a soil layer, how could you ever fully terraform Mars and other planets?

And what about alien biologies? Even if they'd be incompatible with human/Earth biology, large alien plants could still provide the cover that the terrain modifiers represent.
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2.20 was a typo :)
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C# Mechanics / Re: Water and Terrain in Eccentric Orbits
« Last post by serger on Yesterday at 09:49:03 AM »
As for vegetation... There is no option to have any sort of soil on anoxic planet. No life - no sod - no soil. There will be plenty of rocks, sand and mineral dust, yet to have a soil or even clay (except on oceanic abyssal flat) - you need at least thousands of years of ubiquitous terrestrial vegetation.

So I think it will be cool to have this feature: a boolean field Soil Layer, possible for the same planets that have oxygen, mandatory for homeworld planets, can be erazed with backing (I'd say average surface temp 1000C), cannot be restored during playtime, mandatory for <1.50 CC.
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C# Mechanics / Re: Water and Terrain in Eccentric Orbits
« Last post by Zap0 on Yesterday at 09:13:29 AM »
As for terrain, it'd make sense if the planet just kept one based on it's average temperature. It makes sense to assume that the landscape has come to some sort of stable state after undergoing the same cycle for millenia. As for which average, just pick one you're already displaying on the system view so you don't have to display another one :-)

Counterpoint: On a planet with long cycles it'd make sense if the vegetation changed enough to turn a rift valley into a jungle rift valley for a decade or two and then died off again as the long winter approaches. But one can argue that using the mintemp+maxtemp/2 average instead of the "longer in the cold part of the orbit" average favors higher temps and therefore the more vegetated terrains, representing such cases with temporary vegetation better.

The main argument for not changing the terrain is not introducing more complexity than is needed or easily understandable. For one key planet having such a mechanic may be neat, but for a hundred other rocks that change some part of themselves over the course of their orbit you're probably just going to sigh that this weird interaction threw you a wrench in the works again.

The water changes on your planet in particular are egregious, and I'm also in favor of keeping them in one state. We already have tide-locked planets that may have several states of water on them at the same time, and much like with the terrain, it stands to be reasoned that there is some stable and predictable water cycle the planet has developed.
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