Author Topic: Books of the Imperial Library: The Journal of Analytical Anthropology  (Read 2438 times)

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Offline El Pip (OP)

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Fate Named in the Stars
by
Michelle Hartley, Research Fellow at the Luna Sociohistorical Institute
Nominative Determinism is the hypothesis that individuals are preferentially attracted to areas that are perceived as 'fitting' their name. The concept dates back to at least the ancient Roman civilisation[^1] but had fallen into disrepute by the late 1st Empire Period[^2] before a popular resurgence in the early 3rd Empire Period with widely reported on examples such as Ivan Judge becoming a Lord Chief Justice. While in less erudite circles the idea is seen as merely an amusing quirk of human pattern spotting, there is a large academic community dedicating to researching this powerful and oft misunderstood sociopyschological influence. Thus far the research and critical assessment in the field has been focused on individuals or at most families, so the applicability of the theory to the systems and colonies of the Empire has not been considered. It is proposed to refer to this emerging hypothesis as Cultural Nominative Determinism, in order to distinguish it from the small scale individual focused phenomenon from which it differs significantly in theory and in detail. This monologue draws together the limited common ground that exists around Cultural Nominative Determinism and outlines possibles effects and methods of action, all using the example of the New Australia system. Tentative conclusions on the present state of the field are then presented along with recommendations for further investigation and study.

There is a certain level of agreement among researchers around the likely limits of what Cultural Nominative Determinism could or could not influence, the example of the New Australia system can serve as a useful practical example. At one extreme we find harsh physical reality; given the vast and easily accessible mineral reserves[^3], and the systems secure and convenient location two short jumps for Britannia, it was inevitable the system would become a major mining centre regardless of what it had been called. At the other we find purely social choices, only a system that took cultural queues from old Australia would have chosen the name of Queen Elizabeth IV for their Dreadnought [^4]. In between these two extremes there is vast room for debate, to take the last example the question is would a system with a different name have chosen to build a Dreadnought or is that also a fixed point given the physical properties of the system and the wider trends of history?

Cultural Nominative Determinism is hypothesised to start to take affect after the initial exploration and naming stage, continuing to act at all stages of the colonisation and development process. Systems are always named prior to colonisation and so are the vast majority of planets, so if there is any broader sociocultural influences they run in the opposite direction to Nominative Determinism (i.e. it is the culture of the group doing the selection that influences the name)[^5]. We see this in the naming of the New Australia system, after initial exploration and survey it was identified as full of minerals but with the most promising planets being very hot, very dry and very dusty, a decent shorthand description for most of the mining areas of old Australia. In general the physical or strategic properties of the system determine the initial developments that are planned, which to a large extent shapes the type of people who will be drawn to a system; few miners will be drawn to a border resupply depot, most crofting terra-farmers will steer clear of a designated mining planet and so on. Cultural Nominative Determinism proposes that there are subconscious sociological influences that impact where those people chose to go out of the range of options that are available to them. To stay with the mining example, if both Selby (in the Tyne system) and Mount Isa (in New Australia) are recruiting miners then at the margin they will attract different people. The former speaks to the traditional heart land of Empire while the latter is more explicitly a frontier venture. Location, pay and conditions and so on will all be major factors but, assuming they are broadly equivalent, a differential sorting of recruits can reasonably be predicted. Those who want a change, but nothing too new or different, will be sub-consciously drawn to the more familiar 'core' name, while those who genuinely desire to leave everything behind or a complete fresh start will hear the call of the frontier. It is worth considering that while the difference between Core and Frontier systems and worlds has long been acknowledged, the terms themselves lack a standard universal definition and the many existing definitions are often contradictory[^6]. Culturally the evidence suggest the status is mostly a matter of confidence and self belief, if a system consistently and convincingly acts like it is core it will be treated as such. A crude definition would be that coreworld status is not granted, it is claimed and then others are dared to object. If correct this would predict that it is that it hard to go from frontier to core status, at least in the few decades of the current colonial era, as the initial impression of the system will have been fixed by the first waves of colonists who would disproportionately have a frontier mindset. This has been postulated as one of the reasons behind the New Australian Dreadnought project, to prove they were more than just a frontier mining system. Thus Cultural Nominative Determinism predicts that had system been given a different name, one more tied to the core, they may never have built a Dreadnought at all. Given the vast strategic and cultural impacts of each individual Dreadnought[^7] this result should make it obvious why the field is of such critical importance.

To summarise it is clear that, despite still being an emerging field, Cultural Nominative Determinism is a valuable ontological lens with which to study the decisions and developments of all extra-solar planetary colonisation. In addition there is potential for predictive powers and even beneficial policy making, given the power of colony names to influence development it is arguable that sociological deterministic considerations should be given great weight when names are decided and assigned. Strong links with the existing civil service and Admiralty committees responsible for system and colonial naming policies should be developed to research and explore this further. This research must be carefully weighed as it remains unclear how much of the power of the subconscious influences will remain if the effect is widely known and indeed explicitly planned for, will there be a psychological 'kick-back' against attempts to force a destiny onto a group? Finally greater research into historical examples is required to deepen our understanding and increase the evidence base, the sociocultural history of the Laconia system and it's Spartans is recommended as likely being a rich source in this regard.


[^1]:  In his play Persa Plautus coined the phrase 'nomen est omen' (the name is the sign), an early if incomplete expression of the idea that names influence behaviour and even fate.
[^2]:  The 16th century play Romeo and Juliet contains the epistemologically unsupportable assertion that 'A rose by any other name would smell as sweet'. On it's own limited terms this may be crudely correct, however the intended message of the metaphor (that names do not matter) betrays a hideously limited understanding of the forces of sociopyschology.
[^3]: 'While most well known for it's vast high quality Neutronium reserves, which were crucial in helping the imperial economy survive the Great Resource Crunch of the late 2110s, the system as a whole is a veritable cornucopia of both Trans-Newtonian and standard minerals. Across Broken Hill, Mount Isa, Boddington and Woomera there are over 100MT of TN minerals at an accessibility of 80% or better on the Adjusted Camborne Scale.' Imperial Geological Survey report on the Mineralisation of the New Australia System, HMSO 2221.
[^4]: A worthy member of any pantheon of Heroes of Empire, Queen Elizabeth IV "The Ever Victorious" is especially respected and venerated by those with a connection to Australia; It was under her rule that the country was liberated from the Eastern Syndicalist Pact and brought back home to the Empire in the mid 22nd Century.
[^5]: This is complicated by the fact Admiralty naming policy is a legendarily convoluted subject itself, names being more a product of it's own emergent culture than any imposed policy. For details see Vice-Admiral Russell's authoritative treatise "Monkeys with Dictionaries, Ship Naming in the Royal Navy", Old Oxford University Press 2228
[^6]: As an example the the governmental definition used in elections and civil service matters is based on sectors, Britannia sector being the core and everything else the frontier. The Imperial Communication, Hyper-Post and Transit Commission instead defines things in terms of number of jumps from the Sol sector, which gives similar but different results. In contrast most commercial shipping firms will base prices and insurance on distance in billion km from Britannia, being less concerned with the number of jumps than the time (and fuel) required. Finally the Admiralty eschews all of those options and instead has a definition based on security status and distance to the nearest unexplored jump point.

[^7]: There are countless books and papers to attest this, Taming the Imperial Id - The Superego of the Dreadnought Commanders by Professor Bird remains authoritative on the culture around these vessels while Avatars of Empire - The Dreadnoughts of the Royal Navy by Admiral Vaughan is a more recent and accessible books on the subject.

---OOC Notes:Same universe as the Unbuilt Warships thread. Indeed this grew out of an idle thought about a ship class name and became this, which doesn't even address that though as it's just background and setup for the second post which will.
 
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Offline nuclearslurpee

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The Journal of Analytical Anthropology

I looked and I cannot believe this is not a real academic journal in the present day, nicely conceived.

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[^4]: A worthy member of any pantheon of Heroes of Empire, Queen Elizabeth IV "The Ever Victorious" is especially respected and venerated by those with a connection to Australia; It was under her rule that the country was liberated from the Eastern Syndicalist Pact and brought back home to the Empire in the mid 22nd Century.

The most ridiculous part of this, easily, is the conception that there would somehow be enough time for two more Elizabeths between now and the mid 22nd Century. It is not impossible, but it is wholly implausible given how long the last one lasted.

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[^6]: As an example the the governmental definition used in elections and civil service matters is based on sectors, Britannia sector being the core and everything else the frontier. The Imperial Communication, Hyper-Post and Transit Commission instead defines things in terms of number of jumps from the Sol sector, which gives similar but different results. In contrast most commercial shipping firms will base prices and insurance on distance in billion km from Britannia, being less concerned with the number of jumps than the time (and fuel) required. Finally the Admiralty eschews all of those options and instead has a definition based on security status and distance to the nearest unexplored jump point.

These definitions are all obviously incorrect; the core systems are, very simply, those which do not participate in bonding. 

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A crude definition would be that coreworld status is not granted, it is claimed and then others are dared to object.

Thus leading to such interesting variations as the Canadian Empire definition, in which all systems are core as everyone is too polite to raise an objection, and the United States definition, in which due to a proliferation of objections-raising there are two, partisan sets of cores each defying proper definition.

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Cultural Nominative Determinism is a valuable ontological lens

Clearly the legacy of the former Slovakian Academy of Poetry. 

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In addition there is potential for predictive powers and even beneficial policy making, given the power of colony names to influence development it is arguable that sociological deterministic considerations should be given great weight when names are decided and assigned.

This is the most dangerous assertion in the monologue, after all if we ask whether HM's Government can really be trusted with such responsibility the answer should be clear to anyone.

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will there be a psychological 'kick-back' against attempts to force a destiny onto a group?

The PM who proposes to name a system New Ireland will be very much asking for it.

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Finally greater research into historical examples is required to deepen our understanding and increase the evidence base, the sociocultural history of the Laconia system and it's Spartans is recommended as likely being a rich source in this regard.

"I'll take 'Good Names for a System that you Want to Lose All Its Battles' for $1,000, please, Alex."

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---OOC Notes:Same universe as the Unbuilt Warships thread. Indeed this grew out of an idle thought about a ship class name and became this, which doesn't even address that though as it's just background and setup for the second post which will.

I look forward to the arrival of this much-anticipated second post in mid-2024. Part 1, of course.  ;D
 
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Offline El Pip (OP)

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A Warrior by Any Other Name: The Rise and Fall of the Spartan Ideal
by
His Excellency The Honourable George Palmer KCMG, KB. Governor of Pendragon, Governor Emeritus of Sparta.

This treatise should be read as a response to Researcher Hartley's monograph on Cultural Nominative Determinism, previously published in Volume II, Issue 1 of this journal.

It is a sign of the priorities of the Imperial Academic Society that there is no official social history of the Laconia System or indeed any other system, an oversight that greatly complicates the work of the sociocultural historian. As the first Governor of Sparta I flatter myself that I know a little something of the history of the early years of the colony and it's people and may have something to contribute on the subject. I have drawn on my experiences and various record and archives to produce the following potted history of the system and it's inhabitants, in the hope my amateur efforts may assist other researchers in this fascinating field.

The starting point must be that the system was not originally called Laconia. Admiralty records show that, after being discovered by the HMS Beaufort under Commander Copper (the future Admiral Cooper), the system was assigned the name Centaurus under the astrologically based naming schema used by Survey Command in that period. The discovery occurred towards the end of the first exploration wave when public and political interest was beginning to wane, especially for systems like Centaurus which lacked an obvious distinguishing feature. Centaurus was catalogued as a binary system with a large asteroid belt and three jump points, a couple of moderate effort terraforming possibilities were identified along with good, but far from spectacular, mineral deposits scattered across several moons and planets. In short it was nothing particularly special for a public still enthralled by the shocking discovery of the mysterious alien constructions on Orford Ness, the only exception being the spark of interest from the astrophysics community who finally had a chance to closely study a binary star system. The system would remain in this low interest state for several years until the Epsilon Indi Incident and the disastrous and shocking first contact with the Automotons. The full story of that incident need not detain us, but briefly Epsilon Indi is jump connected to Centaurus and, while it had been discovered by the HMS Beaufort as early as 2207 it had not been surveyed or even explored beyond a cursory EM scan. It was not until 2212 that the a proper survey was started with HMS Challenger tasked to investigate the system, she was lost with all hands in a massed missile strike from the Automoton forces who had been orbiting the second planet. The larger survey cruiser HMS Shackleton investigated the loss of communication with first survey, discovering both the wreck and, thanks to her far larger and more modern sensors, detecting the hostile ships at a safe distance. Efforts were made to communicate, with our current knowledge of the abdominal necro-mechanical nature of the Automotons we know these were doomed to failure and indeed they were soon abandoned. The culmination of the incident was the near-catastrophic attempted attack by the 1st Cruiser Squadron, the ships suffering heavy damage and barely escaping the system intact having done no damage to the enemy beyond depleting their missile stocks. As the unwillingness and indeed apparent inability of the Automoton ships to traverse a jump point was unknown this string of events was a shock to the people and politicians of the Empire. The response to this shock is where where the Sparta story truly begins.

Epsilon Indi is a mere 4 jumps from Sol and at that time all the intervening systems were essentially empty, colonisation efforts having been focused on the far more promising Orion branch. Centaurus suddenly became the first line of defence and the first beginnings of what would become the Sparta colony were made. The cargo fleets of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary swung into action and a listening post and refuelling station were established on what was still referred to as Centaurus II. The second Battle of Epsilon Indi in 2213 saw a reinforced cruiser squadron suffer a less serious but equally one-sided defeat and the Admiralty realise that containment of the Automoton was going to be a long term commitment. To this end it was decided a full colony in the system would be valuable, to support refit, repair and recreation facilities and allow the picketing forces to be maintained without having to travel back to Sol. Here we come to the critical decision, the choice to name the colony Sparta. The official position was that it was the Greek connotations of Centaurus that prompted the name with it's associations with defiance and martial vigour, this is correct but far from the full story. The choice was in fact a degree of gallows humour from the officers involved, while it was expected that the defenders of the colony both in orbit and on the ground would fight hard, it was also expected they would inevitably lose such was the technological advantage of the enemy. Thus the colony was named for a group who were 'all bark and no bite' a name which proved sadly prescient; the gap between the confident front presented to the public and the results of the simulated defence exercises was uncomfortably vast for my entire time as Governor.

Despite the looming threat at the gate, the early years of Sparta were not significantly different from any other military focused colony. With every month and then year that passed without the Automoton's bursting through the jump point the threat receded in the public mind. In late 2217 the system even experienced further development with an auto-mining installation established on Gorgon and the start of the private sector Amyclae Minerals operations on the eponymous moon. These were the last events I directly experienced as in 2218 I was moved to my current role as Governor of Pendragon, given later events it is darkly humorous that this was because Pendragon was seen as less politically and culturally stable than Sparta and more in need of a safe set of hands. It would fall to the new governor, the dramatically named Max Power, to handle the double shock of the encounters with two new, hostile alien species. The Gravehenge Cartel and the Sourmagh Combine were wildly different but from the perspective of Sparta they had three key similarities; they were hostile, they were close and crucially they were active. The running battles throughout the aliens home systems and back through Gladius and even Wayland caused something approaching panic as the system seemed surrounded by enemies. The response was another key point in the history of the colony, Governor Power made the unfortunate decision to rally the populace partly as British citizens but also as Spartans, perhaps inspired by his own "colonial" background as a graduate of the Luna Academy. The immediate threat passed and the Royal Navy would push back and then contain the two new enemies but by then the cultural infection had already taken hold, sadly encouraged by the inexperienced Governor.

The system's adoption of the Spartan ideals, or at least a heavily romanticised, sanitised and anglicised version of those ideals, was initially seen by the rest of the Empire as a mostly harmless fad. A few of the more public facing institutions were renamed but kept the same in form and more obviously the system was 'refounded' with it's current name of Laconia after a vicious bureaucratic fight which I'm told is still the talk of Civil Service legend. Culturally there was a fashion for speech to be as brief and witty as possible, while an affectation to being the frontline defenders of the Empire, but not expecting 'civilians' to appreciate that, was all but compulsory. This was not all talk, shipyards and training grounds were built, the colony was one of the few that had a waiting list to join the Navy and Army and a Military Academy was founded to train new leaders. The peak of this was the saga of HMS Bellerophon, like many an ambitious colony it was decided to build a capital ship, in this case a variant of the Renown-class battlecruiser. The technical specs need not detain us as it was the name that attracted the more intense interest, the Spartans wished to name the ship after a mythical hero such as Lysander or more controversially Leonidas. This did not go down well with the the rest of the Empire however, the Admiralty noted neither option had any real pedigree as a capital ship name and that the historical connotations of both names were not wholly positive. Far more seriously this was the point where the Imperial Parliament decided that the affectation with Sparta was tipping over into a dangerous obsession. The immediate problem was resolved when Bellerophon emerged as an acceptable compromise being both classical and having been used for many successful and celebrated Royal Navy capital ships for centuries. In parallel with this pressure began to be applied to reshape the colony, beginning at the top; Governor Power was reassigned to Gomorrah (a new colony in the Nocturne system) and put under the close supervision of the system Governor-General based on Gotham. It is however unclear how much influence this had as these moves occurred in parallel with developments in the wider Empire that also undermined the system's identity. The Grand Fleet under Admiral Vaughan, and led by the famed and feted battlecruisers HMS Renown and Repulse, had swept the Sourmagh and the Gravenenge from the stars in 2223 and 2224. While the campaigns to conqueror their homeworlds would be far longer grinding campaigns of attrition the final result was never in doubt once the Empire controlled orbit. This was followed up by the 4th Battle of Epsilon Indi where HMS Repulse and the 5th Cruiser Squadron was able to destroy the mobile Automoton ships in that system, even if the orbital bases remained too tough a nut to crack. The change however was clear, the Spartan claim to being a 'frontier' system, always somewhat shaky, was now a subject of open derision, something encouraged by the new Governor through official and unofficial channels. The final blow was the first triumphant deployment of HMS Dreadnought in the 6th Battle of Epsilon Indi in early 2227, after which Commodore Shepard was the first Navy officer able to report a complete victory against the Automoton with all enemy ships and bases destroyed. Amongst the celebrations even the most stubborn Spartan realised that the game was up.

From a hardheaded practical perspective nothing changed, there was no grand redeployment of forces away and no fleet of cargo ships swooping down to move critical infrastructure to it's new home. What had changed was that Sparta was no longer a key defensive base with an implacable foe on the other side of a jump point, she was now a core world deep in the heart of the Empire, several jumps away from the actual frontier colonies let alone an actual threat. It would be Nimrod and Nocturne who became the frontline systems while Laconia had to adapt to a new role. It was one she was well suited to, Sparta remained a Sector Capital with a respectable industrial base, on the military side her academy remained prestigious and she was home to the largest army recruitment and training base outside of Sol while her skies held the third largest shipyard complex in the Empire. But it required a different mentality and as the population began that change so the more performative elements of their affected Spartan identity began to fall away. The core elements did not change, to this day there is not a single commercial shipyard in orbit and recruitment rates for the academies and army training centre remain way above average, but the details and presentation did. The first proof of this was in the cruiser design contest in late 2227, the Spartan design proposal did not have a Greek or even Classical name but was called Challenger. An entirely traditional Royal Navy capital ship name she also honoured the survey ship that had been lost during the initial exploration of Epsilon Indi, an example of how the system could have their own priorities and mythos while still being within the British mainstream.

I cannot pretend to be a dispassionate commentator on this subject, but I do not believe the Spartan phase of the colony was inevitable or even predictable with our current understanding of colonial socio-pyschology. Other colonies have been on the front line of severe threats and not undergone such radical changes, The Drift in the Gladius system was jump connected to two alien homeworld systems but did not remake itself as a high-Victorian society. (In passing it is worth noting that this colony was expected by the Admiralty and General Staff to be able to hold out against enemy attack and so was named after a group that fought hard and won). The speed with which the change took hold of Sparta and then the greater speed with which it collapsed do not suggest a deep rooted phenomenon but something transient and evanescent. I would tentatively suggest that due to it's location and resources the system was always going to develop as a large shipbuilding and army recruitment and training hub, but the large military academy and complete lack of commercial yards is very much a Spartan legacy.

I hope this treatise does aid in starting a more professional and thorough sociocultural study of the system, above all I feel there would be great value for the field in understanding why cultural normative determinism took hold so strongly there and not in other similar systems. If a theory for predicting when and how this phenomenon will manifest could be developed  I feel sure it would be of great value to the Empire and may finally attract the official attention the subject deserves.

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OOC Notes - I ended up with a fair amount of depth behind things in this game and I do hope this barely tangentially fighting related post is of interest, though it is of course far too late to do anything about that. I would note the RNG was particularly helpful in this game, for instance the first Governor of Sparta had the character traits Academic and Observer, so of course he had to write something into this most prestigious of journals.
 
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Offline Garfunkel

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Interesting read. I admit I usually pick names either from a list or based on some characteristics of the system and then never bother renaming anything even if there was a solid reason to do so.
 
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Offline nuclearslurpee

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I look forward to the arrival of this much-anticipated second post in mid-2024. Part 1, of course.  ;D

You're early. And brief.


As the first Governor of Sparta I flatter myself that I know a little something of the history of the early years of the colony and it's people and may have something to contribute on the subject.

Given what we know of politicians, this is a bold claim.

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until the Epsilon Indi Incident and the disastrous and shocking first contact with the Automotons. The full story of that incident need not detain us,

A rather choice assessment of needs, here.

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with our current knowledge of the abdominal necro-mechanical nature of the Automotons

It is perhaps a telling sign of the British scientific establishment of the period, that so much attention was devoted to the abdominal sections of the Automotons and, apparently, so little attention devoted to the other components of their anatomy. Do we yet know, for instance, whether the nervous or the locomotive systems are also necro-mechanical, or is this merely an assumption borne from the coupling of scientific laziness and, per the topic, nominative determinism? Either way, the possibility that these Automotons are not actually that, but rather are composed of disembodied heads welded to necro-mechanical abdomens which are mounted on giant spider legs merits further study at great government expense, and I am submitting a proposal this week to that effect.

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The culmination of the incident was the near-catastrophic attempted attack by the 1st Cruiser Squadron, the ships suffering heavy damage and barely escaping the system intact having done no damage to the enemy beyond depleting their missile stocks.

Stop stealing my half-written AAR updates, ye cur.

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The choice was in fact a degree of gallows humour from the officers involved, while it was expected that the defenders of the colony both in orbit and on the ground would fight hard, it was also expected they would inevitably lose such was the technological advantage of the enemy. Thus the colony was named for a group who were 'all bark and no bite' a name which proved sadly prescient;

And here, of course, our glamorous author is to be commended for his excellent grasp on matters of historical fact, particularly where said fact stands in opposition to popular perception.

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It would fall to the new governor, the dramatically named Max Power,

Please tell me this was a gift from the RNG.

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Governor Power made the unfortunate decision [...] perhaps inspired by his own "colonial" background as a graduate of the Luna Academy.

The natural conclusion. 

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like many an ambitious colony it was decided to build a capital ship, in this case a variant of the Renown-class battlecruiser. The technical specs need not detain us

Aww.

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Governor Power was reassigned to Gomorrah (a new colony in the Nocturne system)

Just out of curiosity, would the author consider Gomorrah to be on the rear lines of the Empire? No reason, just asking, certainly I would not find it childishly amusing if a governor with a name worthy of a particularly unsavory class of entertainment media were to find himself stuck in the rear on a planet with such a name...

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It would be Nimrod and Nocturne who became the frontline systems

Well, never mind, there goes that joke...

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The second Battle of Epsilon Indi
This was followed up by the 4th Battle of Epsilon Indi
The final blow was the first triumphant deployment of HMS Dreadnought in the 6th Battle of Epsilon Indi

Clearly we have missed out on some important events, surely an oversight and not intentional due to the poor light these events might shed on Imperial British history.

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If a theory for predicting when and how this phenomenon will manifest could be developed  I feel sure it would be of great value to the Empire and may finally attract the official attention the subject deserves.

Because clearly, not enough attention has already been given to this critical and badly understudied phenomenon.

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OOC Notes - I ended up with a fair amount of depth behind things in this game and I do hope this barely tangentially fighting related post is of interest, though it is of course far too late to do anything about that.

Frankly, if the authors of fighting-related posts gave as much consideration for such trivia as "interest" and "depth", many AARs would be vastly improved for it.

At any rate, another thrilling and exciting update, at least for the academics in the audience of which I note two present; in fact, as these form the entire commenting audience to date we may safely dispense with the qualifier. Given the current frightening pace, far exceeding even the most liberal expectations, I look forward to the next in the series at this time next week.  ;)
« Last Edit: July 31, 2023, 02:52:36 PM by nuclearslurpee »
 
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Offline El Pip (OP)

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Interesting read. I admit I usually pick names either from a list or based on some characteristics of the system and then never bother renaming anything even if there was a solid reason to do so.
I normally do similar, but this was an unusual game in many ways. Glad you found it interesting. :)

You're early. And brief.
Those two observations are connected.

Given what we know of politicians, this is a bold claim.
It was only a little something, so the bar was set reassuringly low.

A rather choice assessment of needs, here.
A necessary sacrifice in order to achieve brief and thus early.

It is perhaps a telling sign of the British scientific establishment of the period, that so much attention was devoted to the abdominal sections of the Automotons and, apparently, so little attention devoted to the other components of their anatomy. Do we yet know, for instance, whether the nervous or the locomotive systems are also necro-mechanical, or is this merely an assumption borne from the coupling of scientific laziness and, per the topic, nominative determinism? Either way, the possibility that these Automotons are not actually that, but rather are composed of disembodied heads welded to necro-mechanical abdomens which are mounted on giant spider legs merits further study at great government expense, and I am submitting a proposal this week to that effect.
These are the sort of questions the B/G scientists should be researching, alas they are too busy doing normative determinism.

And here, of course, our glamorous author is to be commended for his excellent grasp on matters of historical fact, particularly where said fact stands in opposition to popular perception.
There is quite a gap between the perception and reality of the Spartans, well as much as the reality as we're ever likely to know given the time gap.

Please tell me this was a gift from the RNG.
It was indeed, though I think it gets even better.

He was a living argument against Normative Determinism as he had/has the traits 'Pessimistic', 'Nervous', 'Inconsiderate' and 'Cowardly', none of which are particularly Max Power-esque. However they did seem perfect for the sort of leader who would cosplay as a mythical Spartan warrior to hide his own insecurities.

Aww.
I might have to do one of the Dreadnought tomes as the next Book in the Library.

Clearly we have missed out on some important events, surely an oversight and not intentional due to the poor light these events might shed on Imperial British history.
The 5th Battle of Epsilon Indi was a bit of a damp squib. Both the Renowns and some supporting cruisers once again couldn't overcome the massed AAM spam from the orbital missile bases.

Probably. Maybe if they'd persevered and taken heavy damage/losses they could have forced the issue. But I decided the prize wasn't worth the candle and pulled them back.

Because clearly, not enough attention has already been given to this critical and badly understudied phenomenon.
We all look forward to the future version where there actually is something useful for the B/G scientist to do, apart from the one that does the terraforming research.

Frankly, if the authors of fighting-related posts gave as much consideration for such trivia as "interest" and "depth", many AARs would be vastly improved for it.
It is odd that so few exploit the incredible role play and depth potential of the game.

At any rate, another thrilling and exciting update, at least for the academics in the audience of which I note two present; in fact, as these form the entire commenting audience to date we may safely dispense with the qualifier.
What the academic audience lacks in quantity, it makes up for in quality.

Given the current frightening pace, far exceeding even the most liberal expectations, I look forward to the next in the series at this time next week.  ;)
Though sadly that quality does not extend to realistic time estimations. ;)
 
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Offline Warer

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Frankly, if the authors of fighting-related posts gave as much consideration for such trivia as "interest" and "depth", many AARs would be vastly improved for it.
It is odd that so few exploit the incredible role play and depth potential of the game.

Thinking and writing is hard, I don't keep notes for school much less a game! If I do RP as I play I tend to just keep it between the ears.
 

Offline nuclearslurpee

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  • Radioactive frozen beverage.
Frankly, if the authors of fighting-related posts gave as much consideration for such trivia as "interest" and "depth", many AARs would be vastly improved for it.
It is odd that so few exploit the incredible role play and depth potential of the game.

Thinking and writing is hard, I don't keep notes for school much less a game! If I do RP as I play I tend to just keep it between the ears.

I'm very opposite, I keep notes even for games I don't end up publishing as AARs. At some point it becomes almost as much of an addiction as the actual game...  ;D
 
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Offline Bryan Swartz

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FYI that's me also.  I find that I often just don't enjoy playing games anymore if I'm not writing about them.  Strange, but it is what it is. 
 
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